Rudie

Rudie

Rudie

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Nobody gives a damm about songs anymore, accept John Moreland

So a collapsed CD unit meant album fell out the heap that I'd never seen, the album, 'In The Throes', is one of the best albums I've heard in years, its a hugely emotional work, and whilst I was late to the party, I took a chance to quiz Moreland on his eceptional work.

Some days, being John Moreland has to hurt. As others bury experiences and stifle regrets, Moreland pokes old wounds until you’re sure they’ve got to be bleeding again. It’s painful. But in Moreland’s care, it’s also breathtakingly beautiful. 

 

The title of track two is great, best I’ve heard in ages, when / where you when you came up with ‘Nobody gives a dam about songs anymore’?

I wrote that song at my parents' house in 2011. I was listening to a Scott Nolan song called 'Bad Liver / Broken Heart' (most people know Hayes Carll's cover of it), and it has a line that says 'doesn't anybody care about truth anymore / maybe that's what songs are for,' and I guess I wanted to explore that thought a little more.

 

The record just bobs along, chilled, relaxed, like a purring V8 is that a conscious decision or just reflective of your personality?

When I made that record, I had recently parted ways with the band I had been playing with, so I knew I was gonna have to go out and tour solo, and I wanted to make a record of songs that would translate well to a solo acoustic live situation.

“This isn’t how it would feel to have made it” – you enjoy being a musician? It’s a compunction?

'I enjoy being a musician' is an understatement. It's all I've wanted to do since I was a kid. But that song is reflecting on being a naive 17 year old in a band, and thinking that putting out a record and going on tour means you've 'made it,' only to find out how hard touring can actually be.

 

There is a lovely tone to the record, what do you play? 

Where was it record? 

I played everything except piano and pedal steel. I recorded it myself, in the spare bedroom of my parents' house, because that's where I lived at the time.

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The Glorious North

The Glorious North invite you into a whiskey stained world of lost loves, loaded Lugers and booze-addled broken hearts.  With a sound they call Slacker Country, the have created a hum that is super charged country pop. Lyrics to lead you into the beautiful darkness tell tales of small bars in the small hours and the sordid sins of lost and lonesome souls.

 

Can you tell us about yourself? Where you're from and what you've been up to over the past few years?

The Glorious North hail from the pubs of inner city Melbourne Australia.  Founded early in 2014, we have been plying our version of alt-country to ever increasing crowds since.  We release our debut EP, Dang!, in September 2015 to which we received steady airplay, which we have recently followed with our debut album “Welcome To the Glorious North”.  During this time we have been gigging constantly throughout Australia.

How would you describe your music?

We would like to think of ourselves as quintessentially Melbourne sounding, if there is such a thing.  Coming from Australia, we are exposed to many influences, both domestically and internationally.  We call our sound “Slacker Country”, using Country music’s want to spin a good story, intertwined with a bank of loud guitars and melodies that have a hook the size of a submarine.

Can you tell us a little bit about your influences?

Alcohol, women and the heady mixture of them mixing.  What we listen to is quite vast.  From Hank Williams and The Band, to lyrical doyens like Nick Cave and Paul Kelly.  You would also find the Black Keys, Creedence, Dinosaur Jnr, The Avett Brothers and more on our Ipod.

What are you currently promoting?

Our debut Album: Welcome to the Glorious North.  Recorded over 250 days through 2015/2016, it was released  on the 1st August this year.

Have you got a particular song you've done that you're particularly proud of, one that might define you?

I think No Soul To Save, the lead track from the album, encapsulates what we’re about: Love goes wrong on the outlaw fringe. A chain-gang choir "oohs" and "aahs" as fiddle battles guitar in a race to a minor-keyed crescendo. The story teller admits: "No weeping widow will stand my grave/No prayers to whisper 'cause there's no soul left to save."

What are you currently listening to?

Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats are getting a pretty decent rotation on the stereo at the moment.

And your favourite album of all time, the one you couldn't do without?

We never leave home with “Tomorrow the Green Grass” by the Jayhawks.  A perfect album.

What are your hopes for your future career?

The spread the Glorious North’s music to as many ears as possible.  Our live shows a quite a treat, which we love doing, and want to do in front of many people as possible, in as many countries as possible.

If money were no object what would be your dream project?

Would LOVE to put ourselves up in Alabama at Muscle Shoals to record an album.  To be in that room to record would be awesome.

What's the best thing about being a musician?

Having people singing your songs back to you is a special kind of feeling.

And the worst?

Nothing really, it’s a dream job that not many get to do.

Finally, have you anything you'd like to say to the readers of Americana UK?

Please treat your ears to our debut album, Welcome to The Glorious North as we doff our cap pointedly to the blues and country music traditions of the American south.  There are plenty of tales of love lost, hard drinking, passion fuelled killings and living on the wrong side of the law, but even the most traditional of these get refreshed in subtle ways.

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Ben Glover

When an ocean separates the two halves of your whole, it's worthy of contemplation. For Irish-born, Nashville-based singer/songwriter Ben Glover, that consideration comes in the form of his new album, The Emigrant, which folds his two worlds into one. 

Co-produced by Glover and Neilson Hubbard, the album features six traditional folk songs and four original compositions (including co-writes with Gretchen Peters, Mary Gauthier, and Tony Kerr) as Glover addresses the universal theme and personal challenge that is immigration. Though that hot topic lies at the heart of this pseudo-concept album, The Emigrant also concerns itself with how we deal with change, loss, and hope, as well as how we ultimately survive when faced with the trials and tribulations of life. 

 

Can you tell us about yourself? Where you're from and what you've been up to over the past few years? 

I’m originally from Glenarm in County Antrim, it’s a small costal village on the north coast of Ireland. For the last seven years though I’ve been living in Nashville where I’ve been making records and writing songs with lots of different artists. Thankfully I get back to tour in the UK and Europe regularly.  I’ve just made my sixth album, The Emigrant, and signed to Proper Records.

How would you describe your music?

File under songs that don’t hesitate to wander into the more contemplative subjects with musical hints of folk, celtic soul and Americana. 

Can you tell us a little bit about your influences?

Nothing too surprising - Dylan, Cohen, Cash, Van Morrison, Tom Waits, Hank Wiliams, Neil Young and Irish folk music. 

What are you currently promoting?

My new record, The Emigrant, is released on Proper Records on 30th September. I’m also spreading the word about my upcoming UK tour with Brandy Clark which kicks off on 20th September.

Have you got a particular song you've done that you're particularly proud of, one that might define you?

I’m not sure that I’d say that this song defines me but I am very proud of the song Blackbirds. I co-wrote it with Gretchen Peters and it won International Song Of The Year at the 2016 UK Americana Awards.

What are you currently listening to?

I’ve been listening to Mickey Newbury over the past few days but honestly most of the time recently my ears are on podcasts more so than music.

And your favourite album of all time, the one you couldn't do without?

There’s a few contenders for that but I’m going to go for Dylan’s ‘Blood On The Tracks.’

What are your hopes for your future career?

I’d be very grateful if the future allows me to keep on doing what I’m doing - writing songs, collaborating with great artists, making albums and touring.

If money were no object what would be your dream project?

It would be pretty cool to make a live album at the Ryman in Nashville. Or if the Traveling Wilbury’s planned on doing a reunion album and tour and I got an invite to be Paddy Wilbury I wouldn’t have to consider my reply for more than a second.

What's the best thing about being a musician?

Without a doubt it’s being able to get up everyday and do the thing that I love doing the most. On top of that I get to work with incredibly creative people and am able to experience parts of the world that I probably would never have been able to if it weren’t for the music.

And the worst?

Being away from family when touring. That aspect of it doesn’t get any easier.

Finally, have you anything you'd like to say to the readers of Americana UK?

If it weren’t for fine people like those who support Americana UK so much new music and non-mainstream artists wouldn’t be heard or have careers, so honestly all I can say to the readers is a massive thank you.

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Yellow Castle

Yellow Castle are an up and coming indie pop/folk duo from across the pond. 

 

Can you tell us about yourself? Where you're from and what you've been up to over the past few years?

Pete: Hello, I’m Pete. I’m from Perth, Western Australia and I’m an aspiring musician and songwriter, ½ of Yellow Castle. I’ve always really enjoyed writing music, I feel like coming up with catchy melodies is my strongest strength in life. I’m quite odd, my family and friends will often say ‘that’s just Pete being Pete’. I speak my mind, but my honesty is my bond. I’m also a very keen football supporter and player, I support Arsenal Football Club in the English Premier League. In the past few years, I’ve done a Diploma in Music, worked a handful of hospitality jobs and travelled around Europe, Asia and Australia with my family. I’d really like to be in a position where I can say that music is my full time job. 

Em: Hey, I’m Em and you can pretty much copy and paste Pete’s first line! I’ve played piano since I was a little girl, always loved to sing along to the radio and a Bratz doll inspired my first legit attempt at songwriting. I played Wendy in my primary school’s adaptation of Peter Pan and was pretty much convinced I’d be a musical theatre star, minus the dancing. Then I joined a band in highschool called 44th Sunset, we won a competition and felt like rockstars for a bit, I stayed on with my friend who was the drummer and he first introduced me to Pete and his brother, which became Rich King Matthews- our first step into indie folk pop. In the mean time, I completed an acting degree to help build confidence as a performer and challenge my creativity. My most music related job so far was singing karaoke covers of old hits on a wine boat…Like Pete, I would love to be able to make a living off my own music. 

How would you describe your music?

Pete: That’s a hard question, but I think what I’m trying to create with my music is catchy melodies that get stuck in your head and ones that you can comfortably sing along to.

Em: I’d probably say upbeat, catchy, honest and warm indie folk pop. 

Can you tell us a little bit about your influences?

Pete: Certainly can. My influences are predominately UK-based, with bands such as The Kooks (my all-time-favourite band), definitely Mumford &Sons- I love their writing style, I was a huge fan of Noah and The Whale before they unfortunately broke up and Slow Club I really like a lot- I would love to one day support them, as I think that Em and I would be perfect for their vibe. Also, I can’t forget to mention a few American bands I’m really enjoying right now, such as Vampire Weekend, Bronze Radio Returns and Farewell Milhaukee.

Em: I grew up loving old Hollywood musicals, show-tunes and stars like Judy Garland and Marilyn Monroe, with their warm and sultry vocals and big bands backing them. I probably learnt all of the words to most ABBA and Beatles songs in the womb… I learnt how to play piano with Delta Goodrem ( haha), then it evolved into a Norah Jones phase, followed by being moody with Regina Spektor and Fiona Apple, then being cute with Ingrid Michaelson. But now I’m more into The Lumineers for their storytelling and clarity, Dresses- who are this super cool duo with cute boy-girl harmonies and quirky electronic beats that make Pete and I like pop more, the catchy as heck Sing Street soundtrack- because that movie was amazing and inspiring and The Kooks- because they are groovy and remind me of Pete!

What are you currently promoting?

Em: We’re officially releasing our single ‘Restless Creature’ with The A&R Department on the 26th August. So that’s pretty exciting getting some help to push our track out there.

Pete: We are at this point a duo, but listening to the track, it sounds like a band… Credit goes to our friend Sam Wylde, who created drums and bass, produced and recorded us. We’re really proud for this track to be our debut single, our music is growing and we’re very excited to record more.

Have you got a particular song you've done that you're particularly proud of, one that might define you?

Em: So far, our song ‘My Daughter’ is the one that we grin along to. It’s what we imagine the bond between parent and child feels like and how it stays strong no matter the distance. Definitely inspired out of love for our super supportive parents and what we look forward to experiencing later in life with our own children.

What are you currently listening to?

Em: I listen to whatever he’s listening to! We share a car most of the time, and I trust him to DJ. 

Pete: Bronze Radio Returns, Mumford & Sons, The Kooks of course, Slow Club and I really like that Dancing in the Moonlight song, it’s got a really cool upbeat groove to it. 

And your favourite album of all time, the one you couldn't do without?

Pete: Probably ‘Konk’ by The Kooks. I really like listening to it, it really brings me up when I’m down.

Em: I really love ‘Cleopatra’ by The Lumineers. It’s the sort of album where the more you listen to it, the better it gets. 

What are your hopes for your future career?

Pete: To be a famous musician, I guess. ( laughs).

Em: To fill a room or more with people who came to see us, who’d stick around if we were on late!

If money were no object what would be your dream project?

Pete: Tour and play in front of thousands of people.

Em: Same, create a big live show and travel. 

What's the best thing about being a musician?

Pete: Creativity and expressing yourself.

Em: Having a way to connect to myself, to others.

And the worst?

Pete: Uncertainty. 

Em:  Trying to make something out of nothing.

Finally, have you anything you'd like to say to the readers of Americana UK?

Thanks you so much for reading, and we hope you like the track!  

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Kaia Kater

The new album from young African-Canadian roots phenom Kaia Kater couldn’t come at a better time. As a new generation takes the reins, American roots music is needed more than ever to remind us of the troubled pathways of our own history. Born of African-Caribbean descent in Québec, Kaia Kater grew up between two worlds: one her family’s deep ties to Canadian folk music in her Toronto home; the other the years she spent learning and studying Appalachian music in West Virginia. Her acclaimed debut album Sorrow Bound (May 2015) touched on this divide, but her new album, Nine Pin (May 2016), delves even further, and casts an unflinching eye at the realities faced by people of colour in North America every day.

 

Can you tell us about yourself? Where you're from and what you've been up to over the past few years?

I am a Canadian banjo player, singer and lyricist. I’m currently based in Toronto, but I’ve been in Elkins West Virginia for the last four years studying old-time music and dance. I received my Bachelor’s degree in May.

How would you describe your music?

It’s a mix of Blues, Jazz and Americana. I sing about modern times and landscapes. Some of the instrumentation on the record includes: trumpet, flugelhorn, electric guitar, bowed bass, etc.

Can you tell us a little bit about your influences?

I’m influenced by a lot all the time, and it’s constantly changing - I feel this is the luxury of living in our day and age - music is so accessible. For this ‘Nine Pin’ record I consciously took influences from my producer, Chris Bartos, an excellent musician in his own right. I also was influenced by the songs of Lauryn Hill, John Hartford and Gillian Welch, as well as the poetry of W.B. Yeats. His one poem, ‘Sailing to Byzantium’, inspired much of this album.

What are you currently promoting?

My new album ‘Nine Pin’! It’s released in the UK on September 2nd and I’m happy to get it out there for people to hear.I poured my heart and soul into this work, and pushed myself to be a better songwriter and artist.

Have you got a particular song you've done that you're particularly proud of, one that might define you?

I am proud of my song ‘Nine Pin’ ,which was the first song I wrote off the album. I read ‘Sailing to Byzantium’, which is about a man who looks back on his life. At the point that I wrote it I was so confused about who I was and who I wanted to be. The song helped me ease into the birthing pains of those emotions and then, eventually, create an album surrounding them.

What are you currently listening to?

I am currently listening to Bryson Tiller’s ‘trapsoul’ and David Rawlings’ ‘Nashville Obsolete’.

And your favourite album of all time, the one you couldn't do without?

Gillian Welch’s ‘The Harrow and the Harvest’.

What are your hopes for your future career?

To be successful enough to travel well and comfortably, to buy a piece of land somewhere quiet and write.

If money were no object what would be your dream project?

To get all my favourite musicians together for a block party, Dave Chappelle style.

What's the best thing about being a musician?

No two days of work are the same. Monotony is foreign.

And the worst?

Travel delays, no health insurance, being tired and away from your family.

Finally, have you anything you'd like to say to the readers of Americana UK?

I’m so excited to get to know the UK more; I had two shows in England and I met some of the kindest most wonderful people. If I’m in town for a show, please come say hi! And thanks for reading this article all the way to the bottom! 

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SERA

SERA is a bilingual singer/songwriter from the North Wales town of Caernarfon who has released a number of Welsh and English albums and EPs. Since moving from the piano as her main instrument to the guitar, SERA is developing a different sound, with her last couple of EPs walking the country/folk line. Look out for her new album in Summer 2016, which she recorded with producer Eddie Boogie, (Eddie Al-Shakarchi) that has a distinct Americana feel to it.

Can you tell us about yourself?

Where you're from and what you've been up to over the past few years?

I’m from Caernarfon in North West Wales. I’m living just outside my home town now, close to the mountains and the sea. Over the last few years I’ve been focusing on my music - writing and releasing music in Welsh and English. I’ve also set up a musicians collective called CEG, and I put on local acts at great festivals such as Festival Number 6, Gorjys Secrets and more.

How would you describe your music?

My music is evolving, and I started out as a piano based singer-songwriter - I’ve moved through folk and country, and landed on ‘Americana’ - and that sound really comes through when I play with my live band which includes violin and slide guitar and some lovely harmonies.

Can you tell us a little bit about your influences?

My influences are really from the landscape, old stories and real, honest emotions. My songs are a mix of personal thoughts and seem to always have a theme that connects me to my home. This is not a conscious thing, but I have so many songs that mention mountains and water...it’s amazing how much your surroundings infiltrate your creativity, without even knowing it!

What are you currently promoting?

I’m currently promoting my new AA single, out August 19th on Folkstock Records which features the tracks Little Girl and Your Joy which are taken my new album Little Girl, which is out on September 2nd. I’ll be launching it at Festival No:6 and have a few more festivals left this year as well as some lovely gigs later in the year to promote the album.

Have you got a particular song you've done that you're particularly proud of, one that might define you?

I’m just really proud of this new album, and all the songs on it. I suppose I’m especially proud of the ones that took me outside my comfort zone, such as Through the Night, which is darker and more rocky than what I usually do. And those songs that are a little complex to play on guitar - I’ve not been playing guitar very long, and when I started recording the album, I was really just a beginner, as opposed to the piano. So I’m really proud of how far I’ve come through the process of recording and gigging the album material. I have a Welsh song on my last EP called ‘Esgyn’ which has taken me a while to master. But now I’ve got it!

What are you currently listening to?

I’ve been revisiting some artists that I used to really love, such as Alanis Morrisette and Sarah McLachlan - it helps me remember who it was that inspired me right at the start to become a songwriter. Currently as I write this, I have Norah Jones ‘The Fall’ album playing.

And your favourite album of all time, the one you couldn't do without?

Favourite album of all time is a really difficult one. I’ll give you 4 that immediately spring to mind! Sixpence None The Richer - self titled album, Alanis Morissette - Under Rug Swept, Lene Marlin - Playing my game, Heather Nova - Siren.

What are your hopes for your future career?

To build on what I’ve achieved so far, and to keep my career moving onwards and upwards. I love what I do, and I hope next year to get more great festival opportunities and more national radio play. I’ve been doing this for a while now, and I just want a future in music that is busy and fun, and to always be able to make a reasonable living from it, so that I don’t have to do anything else.

If money were no object what would be your dream project?

My dream project would involve recording an album with a full orchestra, and then touring at venues like The Royal Albert Hall. I can dream.

What's the best thing about being a musician?

What I love most is that feeling you get on stage at a great event, when the whole band is playing the best they’ve ever played, and the crowds response. And that moment when you finish recording a song and you hear the final mix. Anything feels possible in those moments!

And the worst?

The worst thing is that sometime people don’t think it’s a proper job. That even when you don’t appear busy, gigging and recording, every day you’re at your computer, and always working hard, often without any financial reward. I think some people think you’re just at home watching Netflix (though, sometimes I am :-) )

Finally, have you anything you'd like to say to the readers of Americana UK?

Thank you for taking the time to read this article and supporting independent artists! 

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Rodney Parker & 50 Pesos Reward

This fall the Denton, TX-based band Rodney Parker & 50 Peso Reward will be releasing their long awaited follow-up to their last two studio EPs (The Apology: Parts 1 & 2). Entitled Bomber Heights the singer-songwriter-guitarist is also joined by original 50 Peso Reward bandmembers Brooks Kendall (bass) and Danny Skinner (guitar, banjo), as well as a number of other great collaborations of friends old and new. 

 

Can you tell us about yourself? Where you're from and what you've been up to over the past few years?

I was born in East Texas in a tiny town called Lone Star.  But I moved to Dallas/Fort Worth when I was pretty young.  The past couple of years we've been staying busy both gigging and writing and recording our new record.  It was a long project, to say the least.

How would you describe your music?

That's always been a difficult question for me to answer.  And that's true for most guys I think.  The thing is, when you are this close to the music you don't really know what it sounds like.  It's the same thing after making a new record.  You listen and listen so much that you become the last person that should make a judgement as to what it sounds like.  

Can you tell us a little bit about your influences?

Well I grew up listening to country music because that's what my parents listened to, and I loved it.  Then like a lot of kids when I became a teenager I wanted do my own thing and so then entered rock and roll.  It wasn't until I was in high school that I realized it was possible to do both.  When I first heard the 97's it was like my own two worlds coming together.  And then I knew that country music can be whatever you want it to be.

What are you currently promoting? 

My new record "Bomber Heights", which comes out September 16th.

Have you got a particular song you've done that you're particularly proud of, one that might define you?

Yeah I've got some favorites.  On this new record it would probably be "Steppin' into Sunshine", which I wrote with fellow peso Danny Skinner.  "Tell Me What It Is" and "Guitars" are some favorites from past records.

What are you currently listening to?

Well I'm flying to New Jersey next week to see Bruce Springsteen for the first time.  So right now it's all Boss, all the time.

And your favourite album of all time, the one you couldn't do without?

That's tough.  Either "Red Headed Stranger" or "Still Crazy After All These Years".

What are your hopes for your future career?

We're just going to keep at it.  Obviously everybody wants to sell more records and put more asses in seats, and that includes us.  But more than that we just want to keep making music that we believe in.

If money were no object what would be your dream project?

I think it would be cool to make a record in another country.  It seems like the vibe of a new place would definitely make it's way onto a record.

What's the best thing about being a musician?

Being on the road with the dudes.  Oh and the beer is free.

And the worst?

Nah, this stuff is easy.

Finally, have you anything you'd like to say to the readers of Americana UK?

Come to Texas, I'll buy you a beer.

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Courtesy Tier

Courtesy Tier is a three piece rock group from New York city channeling the heavy blues of the past and melding together an edgy sound of the future. 

 

Can you tell us about yourself? Where you're from and what you've been up to over the past few years?

We are a three piece rock n roll band from NYC. Layton Weedeman (drums/vocals) Alex Picca (Bass/vocals) Omer Leibovitz (guitar/lead vocals)

I (Omer) met Layton when we both attended Berklee school for music. We quickly connected and started playing along with a few of our good friends at the time. For a few years we bounced around playing shows, going from a four piece band all the way to a seven piece band, to braking up our old band. When left without a band, the two of us decided to move to NYC with another of our good friends and start a trio, Courtesy Tier. Shortly after the move our bassist and friend moved away,  and we continued as a two piece. Fast forward about four years. While playing in the band, I'd also been building guitars for a local builder and legend Roger Sadowsky, and with some good luck the guy working at the bench next to mine is Alex. I had met Alex randomly once or twice before Sadowsky, playing shows around town, so we had known about each other. After four years, forty hours a week, and lots of bad jokes we'd developed a great friendship. Being that all three of us were good friends, we'd decided to jam around one night, and the chemistry was clear. The band got asked to do a small tour to Austin TX for SXSW festival a few weeks after our jam and we asked Alex to join us for the trip. An EP and now an album later. Here we are.

How would you describe your music?

I'd prefer to leave the description of our music to the people listening. From our point of view, we love 70s rock, we are children of the 80s and 90s. One of us (drums) is a hip hop fanatic, the other (Bass) loves country music, and we all listen and explore so many genres. We studied jazz in school and have a deep love for world music, especially west African. I'm pretty sure we make blues rock. 

Can you tell us a little bit about your influences?

Continuing from the question above. We are certainly a 90s influenced band wishing that we could be as awesome as Zeppelin or Hendrix or Bob Dylan. 

What are you currently promoting?

We are promoting the release of our Debut album "Everyone's OK" which is coming out this month! The album was produced by Chris “Frenchie” Smith (The Front Bottoms, …And You Will Know Us By The Trail Of Dead, Purple), Peter Katis (Interpol, The National) and mixed by Joe Hardy (ZZ Top)

Have you got a particular song you've done that you're particularly proud of, one that might define you?

Not one song, there are a lot of songs on this album that we feel this way about. My personal favorite is the last song on the album "Home" It's when we get to show the mellower side of our music and it showcases the folk roots of our songwriting, something that we are excited to continue showing off more in our sound.

What are you currently listening to?

Jessi Robertson "I came from the war", Yankee Longstraw, drake, the weeknd, Bob Dylan (ALWAYS)  Recently pulled out John Lennon's "Imagine" again as well. Neil Young is never of the player as well.

And your favourite album of all time, the one you couldn't do without?

This is an impossible question to answer. There are many albums on different days with different moods. 

What are your hopes for your future career?

Hopes are personal. You share them with friends and family. We do look forward to continuing to play our music for people and that people take something that they need on any particular day from what it is that we have to say. 

If money were no object what would be your dream project?

Would be pretty amazing to work with Daniel Lanois though! 

What's the best thing about being a musician?

Best thing: if you have committed to music and it is what you do for life, you get to live freely. that's the best. There is no compromise "grow up, get a job, give someone else 40 hours of your week because that's what you are supposed to do"   you get to be a kid forever, doing what you always did in your bedroom, and that's very fun.

And the worst?

There is nothing that can be categorized as "WORST" it is very hard work, sometimes being broke sucks a lot, but most of the time even that isn't so bad. 

Finally, have you anything you'd like to say to the readers of Americana UK?

Yes, thank you for reading this. If you read this. and we hope to see you soon! 

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Michael Baker

Dust & Bone, the debut album from Anglo-French singer/songwriter, Michael Baker, will be released on October 7th. 
A regular busker, not only on the streets of London, but all over Europe including the French Alps where Michael’s mother is from, Michael is no stranger to hard graft. Living in a van, he’s been travelling the world playing his music to anyone and everyone who will listen. Meeting hundreds of people over the years, Dust & Bone features collaborations with the highly talented friends he’s met, making it something extremely special and personal. 

 

Can you tell us about yourself? Where you're from and what you've been up to over the past few years?

Grew up in the country side in Sussex as a child, the last two and a half years i have been here there and everywhere living in my van and making my debut album.

How would you describe your music?

I find it impossible to describe, it’s the hardest question I get asked. I’d love your readers to let me know what they think.

Can you tell us a little bit about your influences?

So So Many... Paul Simon, Cat Stevens, The Doors, Pink Floyd, Bon Iver & Nathaniel Rateliff to name a few.

What are you currently promoting?

My Debut Album Dust & Bone which is coming out on October 7th

Have you got a particular song you've done that you're particularly proud of, one that might define you?

I think ‘Dust &Bone’ the title track of the album i'm particularly proud of from a songwriting perspective. It was a big turning point for me as an Artist. But on the record i think 'Revolving Doors' will always be the one i am closest to. 



What are you currently listening to?

James Blake - The colour in Anything. Fantastic Album!

And your favourite album of all time, the one you couldn't do without?

I think there are a few that are all up there & switch places to top depending on where you are... at the moment; Nick Drake - Bryter Layter

What are your hopes for your future career?

Just to keep writing, performing, meeting new people, seeing new places & to keep enjoying it.

If money were no object what would be your dream project?

I want to go down to the French Alps with the musical family of friends i have made to create & document my next record in the chalet that my grandad built. Its a really special place & to make a record there has been something i have wanted to do for years and years. 

What's the best thing about being a musician?

The gigs when everything just clicks. I'd say i feel more at home in those moments than any other times

And the worst?

Service stations in England at 2am.

Finally, have you anything you'd like to say to the readers of Americana UK?

Thanks for reading & hope you like the record!

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Twinnie

Twinnie's  latest single ‘Home’ and debut self-titled EP, out on TLM Records. The EP explores different themes of love and loss under the guise of her signature country pop style. Despite being relatively new to the country scene, Twinnie’s first single Cool reached number 2 in the iTunes country charts and second single Home peaked at number 3.

Can you tell us about yourself? Where you're from and what you've been up to over the past few years?

I'm originally from York, North Yorkshire and now live in London! The past fews for me have been eventful/busy! I'm been writing a lot, gigging, signed a publishing deal with universal music, was on a British tv series and bought a house! 

How would you describe your music?

It's country pop, it's fun, easy listening, story telling. Between early Taylor swift and Mumford sons! 

Can you tell us a little bit about your influences?

Biggest influences are the team of writers I work with - they’re the people behind James bay, Tori Kelly, One Direction, James Morrison to name a few. Artist-wise, an old school one for you - Gilbert o Sullivan, Billy Joel, Dolly Parton, Kascey Musgraves, Tupac, Jason Mraz, Queen, The Beatles… A very mixed bag but I love all music though!  

What are you currently promoting?

My latest single ‘Home’ and my self-titled EP!

Have you got a particular song you've done that you're particularly proud of, one that might define you?

‘Cool’ - my first single. I think it's a great track I really would love to get that on the radio more! 

What are you currently listening to?

Marin Morris’ new album and Lucie Silvas 

And your favourite album of all time, the one you couldn't do without?

Billy Joel’s greatest hits 

What are your hopes for your future career?

To be working and to be remembered!! 

If money were no object what would be your dream project?

Career-wise, I would love to be a producer of a musical film and star in it!! 

Personally, to be a property developer. I have an unhealthy obsession with Home Base/Argos/Next… anything to do with home shopping, I like designing stuff! 

What's the best thing about being a musician?

You can move someone with a song or take them back to a certain time. Its an Incredible power that music has over people! That feeling when your finishing up a set and you know when they've enjoyed it and ask for one more… That's the best feeling!

And the worst?

Probably sometimes playing to no audience haha. 

Finally, have you anything you'd like to say to the readers of Americana UK?

Thank you for supporting new music and listening or if your reading this.. Reading! 

The audience is what keeps every artist going, without you I can't do my job so thanks! X

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